Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data

FALL 2021 MATRICULATION

Regarding Fall 2021 matriculation, the polls consisted of 54 applicants to the master’s/sixth-year program, and 41 applicants to the doctoral program. From these pools, a total of 14 female students matriculated into either the doctoral (6 students) or master’s/sixth year (8 students) programs and a total of 1 male student matriculated into the master’s/sixth-year program. The mean total Graduate Record Examination score of the doctoral applicants matriculated in Fall 2021 was 304.3 (verbal = 153.3; quantitative = 151.0). The mean total Graduate Record Examination score of the master’s/sixth-year applicants matriculated in 2021 was 300.3 (verbal = 151.3; quantitative = 149.0).

Currently, there are 28 doctoral and 16 master’s/sixth-year students pursuing advanced degrees in the school psychology program.

 

TIME TO COMPLETION

For the last 10 years, from 2012-2013, 94.5% of the master’s/sixth-year students have completed the program within 3 years, and 5.5% have completed within 4 years

Since 2012-2013, the program has graduated 51 doctoral students. On average, doctoral students require 4.8 years to graduate. The median was 4.3 years.

Students are allowed to enter the degree programs with credit from prior graduate work in accord with the graduate school policies (https://gradcatalog.uconn.edu/grad-school-info/academic-regulations/#Standards) and advisor consent based on syllabus review. This may reduce the time to completion of the MA degree program by the number of credits approved for transfer and by a maximum of approximately two years if a student enters the PhD program with a master’s/sixth-year specialist school psychology degree. Program requirements exclude credit for undergraduate study, study that is remedial, or study which is designed to remove deficiencies in meeting admissions standards. To obtain a doctoral degree, the student must be enrolled in a UConn school psychology program for at least 3 years, even if they already have a master’s/sixth-year degree. The table below contains information about time to completion for doctoral students only.

 

 

 

Outcome

Year in Which Degrees were Conferred

2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 Total
Total number of students with doctoral degree conferred on transcript 6 7 8 4 5 2 5 7 2 5 51
Mean number of years to complete the program 3.9 3.9 5.8 3.8 3.9 6.3 6.1 6.0 4.2 3.9 4.8
Median number of years to complete the program 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.6 3.3 6.3 6.0 5.0 4.2 3.3 4.3
Time to Degree Ranges N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students in less than 5 years 6 100 5 71 5 63 3 75 4 80 1 50 0 0 2 29 1 50 3 60 30 59
Students in 5 years 0 0 2 29 2 25 1 25 0 0 0 0 2 40 2 29 0 0 2 40 11 22
Students in 6 years 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 20 0 0 2 40 1 14 1 50 0 0 5 10
Students in 7 years 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Students in more than 7 years 0 0 0 0 1 13 0 0 0 0 1 50 1 20 2 29 0 0 0 0 5 10

PROGRAM COSTS

Non-resident students can establish resident status after living in the state for one year and meeting some additional specific conditions. For a comprehensive description of program costs, see University of Connecticut Graduate Catalog, available at: http://gradcatalog.uconn.edu/

Description 2020-2021 1st-year Cohort Cost
Tuition for full-time students (in-state) $17,532
Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state) $39,444
Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (if applicable enter amount; if not applicable enter “NA”) NA
University/institution fees or costs $2,820
Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g., books, travels, etc.) $4,284

 

INTERNSHIP DATA

All matriculated master’s/sixth-year and doctoral students for the last 10 years, since 2012, have completed supervised internships. The following tables provide data exclusively for doctoral students.

Internship Placement Table 1.

Outcome Year Applied for Internship
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students who obtained APA/CPA-accredited internships 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 25 2 29 2 67
Students who obtained APPIC member internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 60 3 60 2 0 1 25 0 0 0 0
Students who obtained other membership organization internship (CAPIC) that were not APA/CPA-accredited 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Students who obtained internships conforming to CDSPP guidelines that were not APA/CPA-accredited 5 100 6 86 3 100 0 0 2 40 2 40 4 57 1 25 5 71 0 0
Students who obtained other internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited 0 0 1 14 0 0 1 100 0 0 0 0 1 14 1 25 0 0 1 33
Students who obtained any internship 5 100 7 100 3 100 1 100 5 100 5 100 7 100 4 100 7 100 3 100
Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process 5 7 3 1 5 5 7 4 7 3

Internship Placement Table 2.

 

Outcome Year Applied for Internship
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process 5 7 3 1 5 7 4 4 7 3
Students who obtained paid internships 5 100 7 100 3 100 1 100 5 100 7 100 3 75 4 100 5 71 3 100
Students who obtained half-time internships 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ATTRITION

There were 78 students who entered the master’s/sixth-year program in school psychology during the 10-year period 2012-2022. All of these students completed the program or are still enrolled. With respect to the doctoral program, there were 58 students who entered the PhD program during the 10-year period 2012-2022. Of this number, 6 students, or 10% did not complete the program for reasons that primarily involved a change in their career aspirations.

Variable Year of First Enrollment
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students for whom this is the year of first enrollment (i.e., new students) 8 8 4 5 3 8 3 4 6 3
Students whose doctoral degrees were conferred on their transcripts 5 63 7 88 4 100 4 80 1 33 3 37.5 2 67 2 50 0 0 0 0
Students still enrolled in the program 0 0 1 13 0 0 0 0 2 67 4 50 1 33 2 50 5 83 3 100
Students no longer enrolled in the program for any reason other than conferral of doctoral degree 3 38 0 0 0 0 1 20 0 0 1 12.5 0 0 0 0 1 17 0 0

LICENSURE

All students who have entered the master’s/sixth-year or the doctoral program directly from the baccalaureate degree have passed the Praxis – School Psychology (0401- prior to 9/2014 or 5402- 9/2014 to present) Test prior to internship and therefore were eligible to obtain National Certification in School Psychology (NCSP). In addition, all students who graduated from the master’s/sixth-year or doctoral programs were eligible for certification in school psychology by the Boards of Education in the states they chose to practice.

For the last 10 years, from 2012-2022 51 students completed their doctoral programs; 46 of these students completed their doctoral programs between 2-10 years ago. Of this number, 11 students have been licensed by the Boards of Psychology in their state.

Outcome 2012-2022
The total number of program students (doctoral degrees conferred on transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago 46
The number of these graduates (between 2 and 10 years ago) who became licensed psychologists in the past 10 years 11
Licensure percentage 24%

Assistantships, Fellowships, and Other Aid

School psychology students may be able to secure graduate assistantships, although they are not guaranteed. Students who declare intent to matriculate or are already matriculated in the program will be informed of graduate assistantship opportunities as they are posted via regular program communications. Students interested in obtaining a graduate assistantship, however, should be active participants in independently seeking opportunities.

Graduate assistantships are funded through a variety of opportunities and may be through the Neag School of Education or university-at-large, with funding sources as internal or extramural sources. University-wide stablished requirements for eligibility, types and duration, and related information is posted by the UConn Graduate School: https://grad.uconn.edu/financing/assistantships/.

As noted, the stipends and related benefits (e.g., tuition remission, health care) are established as part of contractual negotiations between the University and the UConn Graduate Employee Union (https://uconngradunion.org/). Stipend rates are aligned on the basis of the progress the student is making toward their degree completion and typically range from full time (approximately 20 hours per week) to half time (approximately 10 hours per week). Updated information is provided by the UConn Graduate School: https://grad.uconn.edu/financing/assistantships/.

The University also makes available numerous financial assistance programs based on academic merit or financial need. These include dissertation fellowships, summer fellowships, pre-doctoral fellowships, dissertation extraordinary expense awards, summer pre-doctoral fellowships, multicultural scholars program, and the outstanding scholars program.

General need-based financial aid includes Federal Stafford Loans (FSL), Federal Work Study (FWS), and University of Connecticut tuition remission grants. This assistance can be acquired by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or Renewal FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Also, students interested in need-based financial aid can access the University of Connecticut’s student financial aid web site at https://www.financialaid.uconn.edu. For a comprehensive description of financial aid, grants, loans, tuition remission, assistantships, and fellowships see the University of Connecticut’s Graduate Catalog, available at: http://gradcatalog.uconn.edu/.

Program Disclosures

At University of Connecticut, there are no policies pertraining to “admission and employment policies that directly relate to affiliation or purpose” that may be faith-based or secular in nature. It aspires to be the outstanding public university in the nation; a center for learning providing excellence in both teaching and research and delivers comprehensive, innovative, and inclusive programs and services for all students.

Does the program or institution require students, trainees, and/or staff (faculty) to comply with specific policies or practices related to the institution’s affiliation or purpose? Such policies or practices may include, but are not limited to, admissions, hiring, retention policies, and/or requirements for completion that express mission and values. No